Dental Assistant to EFDA Success Story

Hey everyone,

I passed not only my E.F.D.A class but I also passed my boards!

 

And I could not have done it without the help of Ms. Cathy M! I was struggling in class at first, making really low grades because to be honest, I just did Not have the sufficient time to study due to working two jobs and going to school.

So I reached out to Cathy who helped me tremendously! I APPRECIATE the fact that she would take time out of her day to answer any of my questions and give me pointers and tips when I needed them.

She was always so positive and as a matter of fact, I think she believed in me more than I believed in myself.

Not only did she get me through school and the boards but she also helped me rearrange my resume and gave me tips for my interview!

I really owe you a lot, Cathy and appreciate everything you’ve done for me.

To future students, I would recommend that if you’re thinking about becoming an E.F.D.A, Cathy would be the best thing that ever happen to you if you start to fall behind or struggle with comprehending the material.

I would like to thank you, Cathy, from the bottom of my heart. I only wish the best for you and your family. I will continue to do you proud.

Kelley G.

(Kelley, It has been my pleasure to help you through this journey and on to your next job. So happy for you, Cathy)

© 2017-present, DENTALTUTOR4ME®, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Passing the CDA exam-Testimonial

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A year ago, I registered to take the CDA exam. I had not attended school for dental assisting; I was trained on the job. However, I tried to study for the exam on my own but found that I was struggling with understanding and retaining the study material. I began to reach out for help with exam preparation and Cathy M., a dental instructor, was recommended.

 

I began studying with Cathy. She provided a variety of PowerPoint presentations, videos, vocabulary material, study guides, verbal review material, and practice tests. Her constant review of all the material helped me the most. She recognized the areas I had difficulty with and always found a way to explain it using “understandable” language and she presented it with a different perspective. Her real life/metaphoric examples helped me dissect, understand and retain the information, not just memorize it.  She was always available and willing to answer any of my questions.

 

I took the state board exam and passed it on my first attempt. There were not any competencies or areas on the exam that Cathy had not covered and prepared me for. She gave me the support and confidence to succeed. I owe much of my exam success to Cathy’s encouragement and commitment to my achievement.

Jordan T., CDA

(Congratulations, Jordan- You’ve been a fantastic student- Cathy)

©2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Certified Dental Assistant Salary

Are you considering a career in dental assisting? If so, there are things to think about.

Do you enjoy helping others?

Many of our patients would rather be anywhere else than in our chair. They may have dental fears from childhood. We need to meet them where they are and help them through the experience. Showing kindness to our patients can help them feel more at ease. If this is something you can see yourself doing, continue reading.

Tasks for the dental assistant

There is no way to list every task that the dental assistant does everyday. He or she is involved in almost every aspect of dental business. Some of them are:

  • Taking vital signs and health history
  • Taking, mounting and processing radiographs (certification required in OHIO)
  • Knowing dental terminology and charting
  • Performing administrative tasks
  • Ordering dental supplies
  • Calling for repairs on equipment
  • Taking impressions and preparing study models
  • Assisting dentist or other members of the dental team in all aspects of dentistry
  • Completing insurance claims
  • Coronal Polishing (certification required in OHIO)
  • Working together as a team

No wonder the dentist relies on the assistant so much. The assistant keeps the dentist on schedule by letting them know where they are needed next.

What can a dental assistant expect in the way of a salary?

There are many things to think about when we ask this question. First, we must look at location. Some areas simply pay more than others. Offices just 15 minutes apart will often have a variation in salaries.

How busy is the office? What is the demand for fine dentistry as opposed to emergency dental treatment? Are there other offices nearby? Some offices do full mouth reconstruction which depends on the ability of patients to pay for treatment.

A full time certified dental assistant can usually start in a range of $28,000 to $35,000 a year. A seasoned assistant that has been working for 20 years can usually see an additional $5,000 to $8,000 per year, but again, this has to do with location and the type of office. Moving to a large city like Columbus could change the numbers even more.

Try to put yourself in the shoes of the dentist. Are you the best employee that you can be? Are you punctual and a good manager of time? Do you work well with other members of the team? If not, it will be difficult to get a raise. We must add value to our position in order to be paid the salary of a really great certified dental assistant.

Later, we will probably offer a course on resume improvement. Stay tuned and feel free to leave a comment below. Cathy, MA, RDH, EFDA

©2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Salary ranges were researched from several resources and compiled for this post (based on a 40 hour week) and are not to be used for salary improvement.

 

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Aseptic Technique and the Dental Assistant

Asepsis = The absence of pathogens

In dentistry we use aseptic technique. The Chain of Infection refers to several links that when connected, will enable a pathogen to move from one person to another and if we do not follow aseptic technique, we can become the “mode of transmission.

There are of course, pathogens in the oral cavity that can be found on the operators glove. We then use the contaminated glove to do something like; adjust our loops or mask, move hair from our eyes, open a drawer etc. The pathogen is now on our eye protection, mask, hair and the drawer handle. If we clean these items or discard as necessary, the pathogen isn’t able to move to another “host”…. But if we do not do so, we have promoted the mode of transmission for the pathogen.

Breaking the chain of infection is necessary to stop the process. We have to be consistent with our infection control process to ensure:

  • That all contaminated surfaces are cleaned properly for the next patient
  • That a clean forceps is available when the doctor needs another 2 x 2 etc.
  • That we never touch our eye protection with a gloved hand.
    • And therefore….
  • That we break the chain of infection
Steps to take when removing gloves after treatment of a patient

You are ready to dismiss your patient so you sit them up and remove their patient napkin. As you thank them for coming in today, it is important to THINK.

  1. Take gloves off first. Grab one glove at the palm/wrist of other glove to remove and then carefully with the ungloved finger slipped inside the other, take it off inside out with other glove inside.
  2. Use the hand sanitizer
  3. Remove mask by the ear elastic and throw away
  4. Remove eye wear
  5. Hand sanitize again

Please remember that your hair should be worn in such a way as to NEVER touch it during a procedure.

Picture this: You are with your morning patient and your hair is in your eyes because you like to wear a cute style with a strand of hair that falls forward when you work. Without thinking, you tuck it behind your ear with a gloved hand. Now imagine that you continue doing this throughout the day. You may easily have pathogens from several patients in your hair after a days work. 🙁 Now imagine that after work, your three year old needs a hug or kisses you on the cheek. …… Enough said….

Using good infection control can keep you and your patients healthy. Look for more on infection control in the CDA course coming in the fall. Cathy, MA, RDH, EFDA

©2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, SOME RIGHTS RESERVED

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Finishing and Polishing Composite

This is the type of material that is available in the members area. The topic is polishing composites which will keep them free of plaque and easier for the patient to keep clean. Our main goal is to help you pass your boards. Study hard – study smart….

This video in its entirety will be available for the spring review. (Spring 2) Thank you for stopping by. Comments are welcome below. Cathy M. MA, RDH, EFDA

© 2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Over-contoured versus Under-contoured

This is the type of material that is available in the members area. This briefly discusses the difference between an over and under-contoured surface which tends to confuse students at times. Our main goal is to help you pass your boards. Study hard – study smart….

This video in its entirety will be available for the spring review. Thank you for stopping by. Comments are welcome below. Cathy M. MA, RDH, EFDA

© 2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Welcome to dentaltutor4me

Hello and welcome to dentaltutor4me.com This is a new website for people in the dental assisting and EFDA fields that are looking for tutoring to help them accomplish their goals and pass state boards.

NOW AVAILABLE: DENTAL ANATOMY COURSE

This is a growing site / community where you can share similar interests, frustrations and victories. We are here to help see you through your journey successfully as you strive to advance your career.

Let us know what challenges you are having. What do you need help with? We are creating new things all the time and want to help you study.

Please click on the box labeled “sign up here to test your dental anatomy knowledge with a free quiz” in the sidebar. You can sign up by entering your preferred email and begin receiving some free stuff right away.

So happy you are here, Cathy M. MA, RDH, EFDA

© 2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Placing a rubber dam

This is the type of material available in the members area. It is only 2 minutes of information about rubber dam and choosing a clamp. Our main goal is to help you pass your boards. Study hard – study smart….

This video in its entirety will be available for the spring review. Thank you for stopping by. Comments are welcome below. Cathy M. RDH, EFDA, MA.

© 2017, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Good Ergonomics

This is the type of material available in the members area that will help you understand the importance of good posture while you work. All of this is available to make the most of your study time and help you to pass your boards. Study hard – study smart….

This video in its entirety will be available for the spring review. Thank you for stopping by. Comments are welcome below. Cathy M. RDH, EFDA, MA.

© 2016, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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The pulp and odontoblasts

This is the type of material available in the members area that will help you understand histology and the pulp tissue of the tooth. All of this is available to make the most of your study time and help you to pass your boards. Study hard – study smart….

This video in its entirety will be available for the spring review. Thank you for stopping by. Comments are welcome below. Cathy M. RDH, EFDA, MA.

© 2016, DENTALTUTOR4ME.COM, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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